Orquídeas que fabrican insectos

The name ‘bee orchid’ is used all over Europe to designate a species of Ophrys of which the flower looks like a bee. But there are more orchids that have ‘bearing an insect’ in their name.
The genus name itself, Ophrys, comes from Ancient Greek, although there are two versions of its origin: one meaning ‘eyebrow’, in allusion to the lip, usually hairy in this genus. Another version states that it comes from the Greek ophirys, which in turn comes from ophis, that is, ‘serpent’.

Text: Manuel Lucas García, photos by José Antonio Díaz Rodríguez, unless stated otherwise
mlucasgarcia at hotmail.com
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O2-Monostegia-abdominalis-Tenthredinidae-photo-Andre-Karwath-Wikimedia-Commons
O3-Leucopelmonus_annulicornis-Beatriz-Moisset-Wikipedia
O4-Bombylius-major-Bombyliidae-photo-Richard-Bartz-Wikimedia-Commons
O1-13062009-_DSC0237-Argogorytes-mystaceus-pollinating-Ophrys-insectifera-photo-Jean-Claessens
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